My Book

allworth_DesignThinking_comp2B-1.png

“…a compelling case for using design thinking to facilitate human-centered, cocreated, high-impact solutions within and beyond the traditional realm of student affairs.”


— Janet Morrison, President and Vice-Chancellor, Sheridan College

Design Thinking in Student Affairs: A Primer s
tarts a fresh conversation in the student-affairs literature. It’s the first book to discuss both design thinking theory and practice in higher education, and it builds a case for user-centred design in student affairs.

Student affairs are student-centred; design thinking is user-centred. Moreover, design thinking believes in user empowerment, just as higher education is concerned with student growth. And equity-centred design is concerned with accessibility and inclusion, which hold great importance in student affairs. The two disciplines couldn’t be more compatible.

But how do we apply the theory of design thinking to a new environment? How do we thoughtfully change cultures and disrupt harmful systems, while working with organizational needs? Through theory, models, and practice, this book plots a path.

Excerpt from the Foreword by Janet Morrison (President and Vice-Chancellor, Sheridan College):

By focusing equally on the theory, mindset, and practice of design thinking, the book fills a gap by providing a roadmap for theoretically informed practice and culture change. Authored by trusted colleagues with expertise in leadership, innovation, assessment, storytelling, equity, organizational development, change management, and student success in both Canada and the United States—the book makes a compelling case for using design thinking to facilitate human-centered, cocreated, high-impact solutions within and beyond the traditional realm of student affairs.

Given the unprecedented combination of new and exacerbated challenges facing our colleges and universities—decreasing government funding, student mental health and well-being, diversity and inclusion efforts, and affordability chief among them—who among us doesn’t need another arrow in their quiver?